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Macon-Bibb parks department plants 292 trees, exceeds Mayor's goal

The Macon-Bibb Parks and Beautification Department planted 292 trees this year, exceeding the mayor's goal of 250.
MACON, Georgia (41NBC/WMGT) -- Macon-Bibb parks are getting a lot greener and it's all thanks to a challenge from the Mayor.

For the second year in a row, Mayor Robert Reichert encouraged the Parks and Beautification Department to plant 250 trees throughout the county, and workers not only met, but beat that goal.

It's a change that's noticeable in Tattnall Square Park. 6-year-old Aryonna Dillard likes the green initiative, because she loves trees.

"They is big and beautiful and some have flowers on it," said Dillard.

She's not the only Macon kid who feels that way.

Signs on the garbage cans in Tattnall Square Park quote others expressing their interest in trees. It's a fitting place since Tattnall and other parks around the county got some new green this year.

"We put in trees for not only their green effect in cleaning the air, but they provide shade, they provide aesthetics for the whole park," said Stephen Lawson, Director of Parks and Beautification, Macon-Bibb.

Lawson helped not only meet the mayor's 250 planting challenged, but beat it. He helped planted 292 this year.

"We decided to go ahead, since we had time, and it wasn't hot yet, to exceed our goal by 42 trees this year," said Lawson.

Third Street Park got new Oaks too. Macon resident Cynthia Gibson appreciates cooling off under them.

"I don't think I would be sitting here if the tree wasn't here," said Gibson.

It costs the city money, about $250 per tree which comes out to about $73,000, but Gibson believes it's a good initiative.

"When you really think about it, trees do play a very big part, and a very big factor in our lives. We just don't think about it," said Gibson.

She's right. Trees can be a source of food. More importantly, according to scientists, leaves give off oxygen, or what Macon resident Tywantra Lockett calls, "positive air."

"The city's and county's are mostly polluted by factories and cars," said Lockett.

She too appreciates the leaves, branches and trunks, and like Dillard, can't imagine a world without them.

"We would be hot and I wouldn't have no fun," said Dillard.

If you'd like to see more trees planted in your neighborhood, Lawson encourages you to reach out to the parks department.


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