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Firefly imaging technology helping surgeons perform operations safer

The Coliseum Medical Center is the first hospital in our area to use a new imaging technology that is helping doctors perform robotic assisted surgeries. 41NBC found out how Firefly is making these operations safer.

MACON, Georgia (41NBC/WMGT) - The Coliseum Medical Center is the first hospital in our area to use a new imaging technology that is helping doctors perform robotic assisted surgeries. 41NBC found out how Firefly is making these operations safer.

Before Jerry Davis' surgery almost two weeks ago, he was throwing up several times a day. He didn't know why, until his doctor in Roberta gave him the news. He had gallstones.

"Supposedly it was pretty bad,” Davis said.

Davis' doctor had him schedule an appointment with Dr. John Williams of Macon Surgical Associates.

"He bumped me up from six months on the waiting list to come on in. Met him Monday, it was Thursday on the operating table,” Davis said.

Before surgery, Davis was injected with a green dye to help Dr. Williams perform the operation. It is called Firefly.

During the robotic assisted surgery, Dr. Williams uses the green fluorescent dye to identify the organs. He can then switch back to normal white light to remove the gallbladder.

“We can see both structures prior to doing any dissection or minimal dissection and prior to applying clips or dividing any structures,” Dr. Williams said.

And that creates an extra layer of safety for the procedure.

“Beforehand, you had to have knowledge of the anatomy and good visualizations to know that you are in the proper place,” Dr. Williams said. “With Firefly, that adds a different view of the structures that can enhance the safety of the operation."

Giving both the surgeon and patient peace of mind.

It makes you feel comfortable, that's for sure,” Davis said. “It makes you feel a lot better with things like this coming along."
Davis is recovering just fine. In addition to his surgery, the Firefly imaging technology has also been used to remove part of a kidney, colon, and tumor.

Dr. Williams stopped by 41 Today to talk more about the procedure and how it is helping surgeons perform operations.

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